• Lucy Faulkner

Interview: Creating “Perfectly Imperfect” Art


© Artwork by BlssmGoods on Etsy


Meet the creator of art that represents all body types, sizes, genders and features.


Klaudia is the founder and designer of a decorative arts company, BlssmGoods. Born from a happy accident, her art proclaims body positivity; she makes sculptures that feature not only all body types and sizes but also scars, c-sections, stretch marks, mastectomies and stoma bags.


Her mission is simple: to make sure everyone is represented and feels beautiful. We are all, as Klaudia says, “perfectly imperfect”. She hopes to exemplify this and is on a constant journey to showcase as many body types as possible.


Her work beautifully and sensitively encapsulates inclusivity, and, through this, she aims to spread further the message that body positivity goes beyond what we are most used to seeing.


Firstly, can you tell me how your journey as a body positive artist began? What inspired you to create art that highlights less represented bodies?


My journey into body positivity sculptures began when one of the first plus-size figurines I made came out imperfect. I filled the marks with gold, thinking of the kintsugi method (Japanese art of repairing broken pottery with gold or silver lacquer). I posted it online, and people really loved it, thinking it looked like stretch marks. This sparked many ideas, and I’m still constantly thinking of new things to include in our shop collection.


Female bodies have always inspired me, so I wanted to create things relating to them. Having body insecurities myself, I wanted to include less represented body types in my work.


How did you come up with the name “BlssmGoods”?


Our name was inspired by blossoms. When I started creating, I worked with flowers a lot, and I wanted a name that reflected this. Since then, I have moved into sculptures but retained the title as I think it also has meaning in the body positivity world: when individuals accept and love their bodies, they grow and blossom.


© BlssmGoods, plus size sculptures


On your Etsy site, you offer personalisation of your works to showcase personal scars and suchlike. Is it important to you that everyone feels represented in art?


Personalisation is a highly significant part of my work; I can tell how important it is for people by the positive feedback. I often get sent pictures from customers who want their sculpture or figure to have similar marks to them. More and more body types are becoming more represented in the media, which is excellent! However, we need also to add things such as marks and scars to the body positivity world.


I also believe that our consumers love the affordability and accessibility of this small symbol of body love and acceptance.


Are your pieces inspired by particular people and their stories or an overall goal of inclusive body types and features?


I think people inspire me in general. When I receive custom requests, I know that other people like them would love to see these same features represented in art. I love custom orders from a range of people - they contribute to the diversity of my shop!


© BlssmGoods, Shibari sculptures


As well as exploring body shapes, sizes and genders, you also explore sexuality. Some of your works showcase elements of bondage and BDSM. What motivated you to showcase this topic in your art?


I believe that sexually positive art is a significant part of the body positivity world. It is important for me to showcase the body in a beautiful way, and I consider bondage, especially Shibari, to be an empowering form of sexuality.


Shibari is a Japanese form of rope bondage that can be used sexually, as a form of self-care or as artistic expression. It is suitable for every body shape, size, and gender, which is why it is essential in body positivity.


Following this, do you ever experience any backlash or censorship because of the subject matter you represent?


Though I have only had positive responses from people, social media sites, including Facebook and TikTok, have banned me from posting due to “nudity”. This discouraged me from using all social media platforms, which is detrimental as I cannot properly advertise my work. I am looking forward to the spring and summer seasons, where I will attend markets and spread my message and my art by talking with people in real life.


What is your ultimate goal in creating body positive and inclusive art? It seems as though it is important to you that your art conveys a message. Do you think you will ever expand beyond a body positivity focus into other movements that are important to you?


My goals for the future remain within the body positivity world. I want to be able to personalise each piece I create even more and, in the future, work more closely with clients on highly customised works. I know it makes a massive difference in people’s lives to see their bodies represented. This is what keeps me going - I see beauty in people.


What are the next steps for your art and your brand? Do you have any new projects you are working on?


I hope to improve my artistic skills further and continue to include as many body shapes as possible. I also aim to promote my brand further to eventually be able to stock five or more shops and spread the body positivity message. I have ideas for many projects; it just takes time to bring them to life!


© BlssmGoods, stretch mark sculptures


For more of Klaudia’s work or to see yourself represented in a beautiful sculpture, check out her Etsy store: https://www.etsy.com/shop/BlssmGoods.